How Episcopal Relief & Development strengthens employees ties with In-House Week

This is a guest post by Erin Heeter, Episcopal Relief & Development.

Every October, our Human Resources department at Episcopal Relief & Development organizes our annual In-House Week. This training and development event is held at our headquarters in New York City. All staff, including remote, domestic, and international, come together for a busy, yet energizing week (with breakfast and lunch included of course!). It is the only time during the year that all of our staff are in one place.

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Rising above circumstances to access learning

This is a guest post by Vanessa Lucius, American Refugee Committee

For some, education is their only hope towards a better future. Here’s an inspiring story about Abdalla, an office cleaner at ARC Khartoum, who’s using his passion, motivation and access to free learning via the American Refugee Committee’s “ARC Learning Education and Development System (ARC LEADS) to transform his life and the lives of others for the better. This story was originally shared by American Refugee Committee.

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Using GLF Ideas and Scouting Hackable Agenda Items

This is a guest post by Laura Musoke, Staff Developer at World Renew.

The Global Learning Forum (GLF) this year gave me so many great ideas – some to implement right away, some to continue working on, and some I’m eagerly waiting to put into action when the right opportunity comes along.  I’ve never been to a conference where I’ve had so many takeaways!

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Three things I have learned in the last three years of “rolling-out” the Introduction to Child Centered Community Development (CCCD) Module

This post was originally published on Plan Academy and written by Pedrito Sandy M. Fortuna, Regional CCCD Specialist, Plan International in Asia Region.

I have been facilitating and co-facilitating, both online and blended face-to-face, one of the Plan Academy’s flagship modules on Introduction to Child Centered Community Development. Although the list of things I have learned over the past three years can go on and on, there are three important lessons that stand out when looking at Plan’s development approach.

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Designing eLearning Courses with Localization in Mind

A guest post by Ingenuiti, a LINGOs partner.

Do you design or create training content or eLearning courses for an organization that operates globally? If you think your content will reach a global audience, you should consider integrating localization as part of your development process. Training has its greatest impact when it is provided in the learner’s native language. If you are a writer or instructional designer and have never considered localization in the planning and creation phase of content development, while it might seem daunting at first, this once dreaded task can be simplified with proper preparation and strategy.

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The importance of connecting: LINGOs community meet up in Nairobi

A guest post by Shannon Dowd from PATH

Last week, PATH hosted a regional LINGOs meet-up in one of their hub offices, Nairobi. As the LINGOs key contact at PATH for the last 8 years, I have had the privilege of attending several regional meet-ups in Seattle, New York and North Carolina. And you know what made this meet-up different? The location and people; that was it.

Here before me sat 15 professionals from 7 different LINGOs organizations who work in and around the learning space. We all came together for the same reason: meet other LINGOs members, share ideas, and strengthen relationships. It was a great mix of expertise and the conversation was rich.

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Do You Want to Help Your Organization’s Managers Succeed? Come Learn With Us!


This guest post is by Mike Culligan, LINGOs’ Director of Last Mile Learning and one-half of the expert duo (with Sam Davis of Save the Children UK) leading the management development
Pre-Conference Workshop on October 13. Check back on the LINGOs blog for more posts from our workshop leaders and keynote speakers! For more information on LINGOs’ Global Learning Forum, visit our website.

chess-e1434637123955The relationship between managers and their employees is a key predictor of the overall health of an organization.  Strong managers result in more productive, engaged and committed employees.  These employees, in turn, contribute more effectively to the strategy and goals of the organization.

However, while the potential impact of strong manager-employee relationships is generally accepted, often organizations have a hard time acknowledging how difficult it is to get this dynamic right in the first place, and fail to recognize the real impact to the organization when teams fail.  Too often, when we retrace our (mis)steps from an undesirable outcome, we focus exclusively on the concrete inputs – budget, calendar, resources (human and otherwise) – without acknowledging that a significant cause can be dysfunctional team dynamics, inadequate communications, or any of a number of weaknesses that contribute to poor management.

So how does an organization avoid this problem?  Too often, we resolve to “hire smart people” – development professionals who are good at their technical area of focus (health, watsan, small enterprise development, agriculture, etc.) – and expect that they will grow into the role of a manager as they are promoted through the ranks.  This leaves new managers in the position to teach themselves, at cost to their own development and that of their employees.

The alternative, developing a training program for new managers, is daunting.  The steep time and development costs of creating a management training program is prohibitive, the skills required to create a curriculum are often unavailable, and organizations often lack the budget to acquire the training materials to implement the program.

Enter LINGOs.  This month, representatives of LINGOs member organizations are initiating a series of meetings in England, the US and online to look at ways that we can improve the management capacity building of our agencies by working together.  The premise is simple: While each of our organizations is unique, good people management is based on several precepts that apply just about everywhere – even in organizations of diverse structures and missions.   Are there ways we can learn from each other and share resources, so that we make good management a far more manageable task (excuse the bad pun)?

These meetings will culminate at the LINGOs Global Learning Forum’s Pre-Conference Workshop, “7 Steps for Creating a Management Development Strategy in Your Organization.”  There, participants will work on developing a blueprint for management training in their organizations.  We’ve been collecting and analyzing the experiences of organizations that already have management development programs, and exploring their curricula, competencies, and skill maps. When you participate in the Pre-Conference Workshop, you’ll be learning from these other agencies’ experiences: tuning in to the commonalities we’ve found between them, discussing their lessons learned, and identifying key success factors.

So whether you have a management development strategy that you’re looking to revamp, or you’re just facing the task of compiling one, the Pre-Conference Workshop will provide a map of what already works for organizations much like your own.

Find more details and register for the Pre-Conference Workshop here. We hope you can join us on October 13!

Plan International Builds on Learning at Work Day Success

Guest Post by Sasha Smith, Plan International Human Resources Assistant

 

Open University awarded Plan International its Learning at Work Day Award for Inspiring Learning. Sasha Smith holds the award at UK headquarters in December 2013.

The Annual Learning at Work Day/Week is a wonderful opportunity to engage staff in learning, motivate them for further learning and promote the learning resources available to global staff. Plan International has successfully leveraged this event in the past, and will build on that experience – and its LINGOs membership – as it expands Learning at Work Day to Learning at Work WEEK May 19-25.

The annual Learning at Work event encourages employers to organise a day of informal training sessions for employees to learn something they wouldn’t normally have the opportunity to do. Plan’s event was such a success that the team won the Open University Learning at Work Day Award for Inspiring Learning. The judges commented that were very impressed with Plan’s objective for the event, the partnership work and the promotion of further learning.

Promoting learning

Plan International’s 2013 Learning at Work Day was an opportunity for our team to highlight the fact we are an organisation that promotes and encourages staff to embrace learning within their role on a day-to-day basis.

With so many employees with such a wide variety of skills and knowledge, the focus was on utilising the expertise of colleagues and the day proved to be hugely popular. Sessions and workshops ran throughout the day and included Spanish and Italian lessons, Microsoft Office training and help on how to make the most of social media among others.

Learning at Work Day Going Global

Plan began Learning at Work Day as a UK initiative, but after last year’s success the aim is to now get offices around the world involved. The team is already planning for Learning at Work Day 2014 and working hard to make sure that it isn’t just an International Headquarters initiative.

What do we seek to achieve?

  • To successfully engage employees in learning and motivating them to learn in the future
  • To promote and engage employees with our current learning offerings and resources
  • To encourage employees to take responsibility for their learning and to start actively planning their development with their managers
  • To go global with the Learn at Work Week by encouraging our Regions to get involved as well as offering some IH sessions as webinars to include Plan’s global audience.

Resources for Field Offices

The HR Operations and Learning & Development teams are creating a resource pack to equip both national and country offices with ideas, inspiration and resources to run their own Learning at Work Day. They are also planning to host webinars using Blackboard Collaborate to encourage participation from around the globe on a range of subjects, too.

The teams are also incorporating social media by creating Plan’s very own Learning at Work Day Pinterest board, and using Yammer to spread the word across Plan.

Resources for all LINGOs Members

LINGOs is celebrating Learning at Work Week by hosting several virtual classroom events that may be of interest to the staff of any member organization. Click the buttons to learn more and register. Registration is free – but space is limited. Please share with your global teams! We’d love to have your learning champions, potential eLearners and mentors participate, engage, share and learn with us!

 

For Learning Champions – We are the Champions! Structures and guidance for global NGO Learning Champions

Join LINGOs 2013 Rising Star Nick Walden of Opportunity International has he shares tips and insights from his organization’s highly successful program with Learning Champions.
Eventbrite - LINGOs - Learning at Work Week: We are the Champions! Structures and Guidance for Global NGO Learning Champions

For All who want to learn via technology – Are you ready? Steps to assess readiness and potential to succeed with eLearning

Join Jim Klaas of Dev Ed International  as he shares some the lessons and approaches for helping learners prepare to be successful online learners. Jim willl describe the online learning readiness passport program developed for a global NGO, and what you can do to prepare for success.

Eventbrite - LINGOs - Learning at Work Week: Are you ready? Steps to assess readiness and potential to succeed with eLearning

For potential Mentors –  Mentoring in an NGO 

Join Janine Hackshaw as she presents Accion’s successful and popular mentoring program. What does it take to be a good mentor? How can your organization (or country offices) adopt it? She will discuss how to overcome the challenge of finding good mentors, and answer your questions to help you get started with your own mentoring program.

Eventbrite - LINGOs - Learning at Work Week: Mentoring in a Global NGO: What you need to be a good mentor

New Kid on the Block

Posted by Gus Curran, LINGOs Manager of Member Services

Gus Curran

It is hard to believe it has been four months since my first day at LINGOs. I’ve been enjoying my time as the newest staff person, but in May, LINGOs made a new hire: Beth Bramble, Technical Support Specialist. Beth will be working with Robb Allen on all things technical support. She brings experience not only with the IntraLearn LMS, but she also has graphic design skills and experience with Moodle. We are thrilled to have her on the team. This means, however, that I am no longer the “new kid on the block” at LINGOs, and this has me reflecting on my first few months on the job.

Making the transition from LMS Administrator/Key Contact for a member organization to a LINGOs staff member was generally very smooth. I had already met almost everyone on the LINGOs team at the annual meetings or at various conferences. I was familiar with LINGOs and its mission, and I was excited about joining the team in the newly created position of Member Services Manager.

My first assignment and priority was to help Robb on the technical support help desk so that he could focus on bigger projects such as coding the Last Mile Learning portal. A few months spent solving technical problems and helping members has been a great way to meet many of you. It has also given me both valuable insight into some of the challenges members face and ideas on how we can address those challenges moving forward.

While stepping into my role at LINGOs has been mostly stress-free, the transition from traditional office worker to a virtual worker was more challenging. At LINGOs we don’t call ourselves telecommuters; that term doesn’t apply, because we all work from home and there is no office to commute back to. I like the term “digital nomad” because I truly can work from anywhere in the world. That said, anywhere in the world up to this point is two places: my house and a Starbucks down the street. But I can work from anywhere, if I want to. I suppose I’m more of a digital roamer. I do occasionally roam over to the dining room with my laptop.

If we’ve met before, you might have guessed that I’m what some refer to as a “people person.” On the Insights Color Wheel, I’m sunshiny yellow! Going from an office full of people to just me in my house was a bit of a shock. The first few weeks were difficult. I placed a bird feeder outside of my home office window and named some of the regular visitors after former colleagues. I looked forward to the mailman dropping by and found reasons to be near the door at the time so I could say “hi.” When the woman who makes a daily run past my house with her dog hadn’t gone by in a week, I was concerned. (Don’t worry—she returned, with the dog.)

By Sarah Stierch (Flickr: Yellow Finch) [CC-BY-2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Over time, however, I have come to enjoy this working-from-home thing. With Skype, Blackboard Collaborate, and that old standby the telephone, I’ve discovered that I stay connected with my LINGOs colleagues and members throughout the day. Skype IM is now my water cooler. I get what I need.

Now I’m handing the new-kid-on-the-block baton to Beth. As Beth takes over as key support contact, I will begin to take what I’ve learned from the past few months and think of ways to improve the LINGOs membership experience.

My “door” is always open. As LINGOs members, you are always welcome to email me  (Gus[at]LINGOs.org) or find me on Skype (gus.curran) if you ever want to talk to me about your LINGOs membership. Not only am I always happy to speak with members, I could probably use the company.